ANIMAL A-Z…


Learn more about our amazing animal collection. Click on a letter below to find an animal or use our animal search:

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Rabbitfish, Foxface (Siganus vulpinus)

Rabbitfish, Foxface
Rabbitfish, Foxface

Bright yellow in colour with a distinctive striped black and white face, this unusual fish can obtain a length of 23cm. 

Although they usually keep their colour day and night, they can turn a mottle brown colour when they are threatened by predators

Their long fox-like snout is used to reach into crevices and obtain food.


Fun Facts...

This pretty fish can give a painful sting from its dorsal spines!


Location...

This species lives throughout the western Pacific.



Habitat...

Coral reefs.



Diet...
Algae, marine plants and small crustaceans.

Least Concern

Rat, Brown (Rattus norvegicus)

Rat, Brown
Rat, Brown
The brown rat is larger and less agile than the black rat. Brown rats average around 25cm in length in addition to their tail being similar in length to the body. They have sharp claws to aid climbing, good sense of smell and long whiskers which are highly sensitive and ensure that the animal does not get stuck. They also have powerful teeth which helps them to consume their varied diet.
Fun Facts...
Rats are highly intelligent and can be trained to carry out a variety of tasks.
They have hearing sensitive to ultrasound and their average heart rate is 300-400 bpm.
Rats are very good swimmers and can produce ultra sonic chirps which have been likened to laughter.
Location... Thought to have originated from northern China, this rodent has now spread to all continents except Antarctica. It has managed to spead worldwide by climbing aboard boats and other modes of transport. Alberta in Canada, is one of the only places in the world to operate a successful rat-control program, resulting in no rats at all!

Habitat... In its native range, rats inhabit stream banks, water courses and wetlands, as well as woodland and coastal areas. The brown rat tends to be found in areas that humans inhabit. They prefer out door environments, so will infest an area around a building rather then inside. They can create extensive burrows but will also utilise any man made burrows such as sewers. 

Diet...
Omnivore-Will eat almost anything dead or alive, including insects, fish, carrion, vegetables, grain, soap and leather.

Least Concern

Ray, Blonde (Raja brachyura)

Ray, Blonde

The blonde ray can grow up to about 120cm in length and is a member of the 'skate' family. It has a light brown back, covered in small dark spots which extend out to the tips of the wings. Its underside is white and it has a short snout with an arched mouth containing 60-90 rows of teeth. On mature individuals, the dorsal surface is prickly and juveniles and females have a rown of thorns down their back.


Fun Facts...

Female rays lay between 40 and 140 eggs a year in eggcases which are about 9cm in length and have 2 sets of horns on either side. The eggs can take as long as 7 months to hatch and the baby ray appears measuring about 20cm in length.


Location...

Found predominantly in the northeast and central Atlantic, including the Irish Sea, North Sea and English Channel.



Habitat...

Common in inshore and shelf waters on sandy sediments to depths of about 150 metres.



Diet...
Juveniles feed on small crustaceans, with larger individuals predating on dragonet and sand eels.

Near Threatened

Ray, Small eyed (Raja microocellata)

Ray, Small eyed
Ray, Small eyed

The most notable feature of the small eyed ray is its large pectoral fins which help it glide effortlessly through the water. From above, it is rhomboid in shape with greyish, olive or pale brown skin patterned with thin light streaks. The snout is slightly pointed and its underside is white. It has a long, slender tail which can deliver weak electrical charges.


Fun Facts...

The electrical discharges these rays can omit are thought to be used in interaction with other rays and the electrical activity is more frequent when in groups or in pairs, rather than when they are solitary.


Location...

Restricted primarily to the Atlantic coasts of Northwest Europe, from the British Isles to Gibraltor and northwestern Africa.



Habitat...

Inhabits bays and inshore sandy areas.



Diet...
Carnivorous, feeding on small fish that dwell on the sea bottom.

Near Threatened

Ray, Thornback (Raja clavata)

Ray, Thornback
Ray, Thornback

The thornback ray is also known as the thornback skate and the colour and patterns seen on this ray is often different depending on what part of the world it is found. The thornback ray get its name from the rows of spiky thorns found on their back and tail. Although these could cause injury if stepped on or touched, they are not venomous like the spines of a stingray. 


Fun Facts...

The teeth of male thornback rays are sharper than those of females and juveniles.  Thornback rays use coastal waters as nursery grounds, so juveniles are found most often in shallow water. 


Location...

The thornback ray is found throughout the northeast Atlantic, from as far north as Iceland and as far south as Namibia. It is found throughout the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Baltic Sea. 

 



Habitat...

Around Europe, this species is usually found at depths of 10-60m, however the thornback ray is a seasonal migrator and will spend the winter months in deeper water before moving into shallower water in the late spring and summer months to breed. The thornback ray prefers to live in areas with soft sediment, such as mud and sand, but can also be found over gravel and rock beds. 



Diet...
Primarily eats crustaceans, such as shrimp and crabs, and small fish, such as sandeels, dragonets, sprat and anchovies.

Near Threatened

Ray, Undulate (Raja undulata)

Ray, Undulate
Ray, Undulate
The undulate ray is a medium sized member of the skate family and can grow up to about 1 metre in length. It has a flattened body, with eyes and spiracles on top of its head. Its snout is pointed and it can be identified by the brightly coloured dorsal surface, with dark stripes and white spots.

The eggs of this species are oblong capsules, with stiff pointy horns at the corners. When the yung are born, they feed solely on the yolk, from their eggcase.
Fun Facts...
When mating, undulate rays will form a distinct pair and the mother will stay near their eggs until they hatch. When the young are born, they will tend to follow their mother and other large objects!
Location... Inhabits the waters of the eastern Atlantic, from southern Ireland and England to Senegal, including the Mediterranean and Canary Islands.

Habitat... Found on sandy bottoms of shelf waters.

Diet...
Feeds on a variety of sea-bottom dwelling animals.

Endangered

Rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus)

Rudd
Rudd

Rudd are large bodied, stocky fish, with yellow or orange eyes and an upward turned mouth. Their colouration usually depends on their size, with larger rudd tending to be dark, with a gold tinge to their scales. They have deep red pelvic, anal and caudal fins and their pectoral and dorsal fins also appear to be reddish. They grow to a length of about 25cm and are often confused with the roach (Rutilus rutilus).


Fun Facts...

When the temperature rises above 15 degrees, male rudds will assemble at spawning grounds and drive females into dense vegetation by vigorous splashing. 


Location...

Native to Eurasian waters, widely spread in the basins of the North, Baltic, Black, Caspian and Aral seas. Introduced to rivers in Canada, USA, New Zealand, Tunisia, Morocco and Spain.



Habitat...

Inhabits lakes, rivers, marshes, canals and ponds. This fish prefers waters that contain large weed beds and can tolerate brackish waters.



Diet...
Carnivorous, feeding on aquatic crustaceans, snails and insects. Adults will eat small fish, worms and plants.

Least Concern
TODAY AT RHYL...

OPEN: Daily from 10.00am.
LAST ADMISSION: 4.00pm
CLOSES: 5.00pm

ADMISSION:
Adult - £9.50 (16-64yrs)
Child - £8.50 (3-15yrs)
Under 3's - Free
Concessions - £8.99
(Senior Citizen, Disabled, Student).

See our Opening Times & Prices page for further info.
HO! HO! HO! IT’S OFF TO THE GROTTO WE GO!

Santa and his helpers are putting the finishing touches to his grotto and fattening up the reindeer ready for their long journey to SeaQuarium Rhyl. 

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FREE Activity Booklet!

During your visit to the SeaQuarium, don’t forget to take part in our free children’s activity booklet.
Pick up a booklet, find the answers to the questions around SeaQuarium and play some fun games along the way! Children will even receive a sticker at the end of their visit when shown to a member of staff!

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