ANIMAL A-Z…


Learn more about our amazing animal collection. Click on a letter below to find an animal or use our animal search:

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Tang, Lipstick (Naso lituratus)

Tang, Lipstick
Tang, Lipstick

This species can be easily recognised by two bright orange forward hooked spines on the base of the tail, its orange lips (where this species gets its name from) and black face mask.

Juveniles are grey and take on a more reddish tone as they mature. A black mask develops between the eyes and mouth and the 'lips' are highlighted by orange as they mature. Adult males often grow long streaming filaments off their tail. 

Juveniles tend to group together, while mature individuals are solitary. 

This species can grow to a maximum length of approximately 45 cm. 


Fun Facts...

They have the ability to quickly and dramatically change colour, depending on mood or environment. When excited or hiding in the reef their body can become almost black with grey patches. 


Location...

Widespread throughout western and central Pacific. 



Habitat...

They are found above coral rocks and rubble in coastal and inner reef flats and reef slopes. 



Diet...
Primarily a herbivore eating mainly leafy brown algae

Least Concern

Tang, Pacific sailfin (Zebrasoma veliferum)

Tang, Pacific sailfin
Tang, Pacific sailfin

This fish has an unusual ovoid shape and can be a variation of colours, ranging from dark brown to light grey. The adult's body is usually dark in colour and has vertical yellow lines and six diagonal, narrow bands. The head is usually paler and the fins are dark with pale blue or green borders.

Juveniles are usually mistaken for angelfish as they have the same oversized dorsal fins but they are bright yellow with narrow black or grey bars. As they age, the bright yellow colour of the body fades.


Fun Facts...

Tangs and other ray-finned fishes use visual displays, such as colour changes and chemical signals to communicate with each other and other species of fish.


Location...

Widespread in the Pacific region and found in the east Indian Ocean from the Christmas Island eastward to Hawaii, then north to Japan and south to New South Wales.



Habitat...

Found usually on tropical coral reefs, from shallow protected areas to outer reef habitats, reaching depths of 40m.



Diet...
Feeds on algae and zooplankton

Least Concern

Tang, Powder blue (Acanthurus leucosternon)

Tang, Powder blue
Tang, Powder blue

The powder blue tang is a light blue fish, with bold yellow and white fins, which grows to an average length of 19cm.


Fun Facts...
Powder blue tangs are a monogamous fish species, which means they will stay with the same mate for life. 
Location...

Found in the Indian Ocean, from eastern Africa to the Andaman Sea and southwest Indonesia to Christmas Island, with its range extending to Bali and Indonesia in the western Pacific.



Habitat...

Usually found in shallow waters around coastal or island coral reefs.



Diet...
Feeds on algae.

Least Concern

Tang, Regal (Paracanthurus hepatus)

Tang, Regal
Tang, Regal

Regal tangs, also know as the common surgeonfish, are vibrant sky blue in colouration and have distinct oval-shaped bodies. Adult fish have dark narrow lines on the dorsal half of their body and a lighter, circular patch directly behind the pectoral fin. The pectoral and caudal fins are bright yellow. Juveniles start off bright yellow, with blue spots and their fins are blue. This colouration changes as they mature. They grow up to 38cm in length.


Fun Facts...

This fish have a toxic, razor-sharp caudal spine which they use to attack predators and are also used when males are fighting over a female.


Location...

Found in the Indian and Pacific oceans.



Habitat...

Inhabit tropical and sub-tropical coastal regions, hiding amongst coral reefs.



Diet...
Herbivores, feeding on algae which they pull from rocks and coral.

Not Evaluated

Tang, Yellow (Zebrasoma flavescens)

Tang, Yellow
Tang, Yellow

Yellow tangs are iridescent yellow with a snout-like mouth and can grow to a maximum of 20cm.

This species is active during the day where it can be found feeding in aggregations numbering several hundred, though will often find a solitary place to hide during the night.


Fun Facts...

Yellow tang is a long-lived species; the oldest wild yellow tang collected was 41 years old!


Location...

Indian Ocean and there is a large population around Hawaii.



Habitat...

Tropical inshore coral reefs, protected bays and lagoons.



Diet...
Varieties of seaweed

Least Concern

Tarantula, Chilean rose (Grammostola rosea)

Tarantula, Chilean rose
Tarantula, Chilean rose

The Chilean rose tarantula gets its name from the pink coloured hairs it has across its body. It occurs naturally in at least three different ‘colour morphs.’ They all have a dark grey undercoat but vary in their pink/beige/copper coloured hairs. It is a medium sized tarantula and has a pair of fangs that inject venom into its prey. The venom immobilises the prey and then the tarantula regurgitates its stomach acid, which liquidises the prey, so the tarantula can suck it up like soup!

Tarantulas are an arachnid belonging to the family Theraphosidae "the true tarantulas", of which around 900 species have been identified.


Fun Facts...

They are also known as the Rose Hair tarantula, Chilean flame tarantula, Chilean fire tarantula, and the Chilean red-haired tarantula!

All tarantulas are venomous, but most are harmless to humans, causing extreme discomfort rather than fatality.

After mating, the female produces a large egg sac which can contain approximatley 500 spiderlings! 

 


Location... Found in Chile, Bolivia and Argentina.

Habitat... Their prefered habitat is arid scrubland.

Diet...
Insects and small mammals such as mice

Least Concern

Terrapin, Yellow-bellied (Trachemys scripta scripta)

Terrapin, Yellow-bellied
Terrapin, Yellow-bellied
The yellow-bellied terrapin, also known as the yellow-bellied slider, can be identified by its distinctive markings. It has yellow stripes on its head, neck and limbs and a yellow-red spot on either side of its head. The carapace is oval shaped and is olive-brown in colour, with yellow bars. Its underside (plastron) is yellow, with dark blotches. Females are larger than the males and their carapaces can grow to about 29cm in length. 
Fun Facts...
This terrapin can live up to 30 years old. Females produce up to three clutches of eggs per year, containing between 5 - 20 eggs. Females travel over a kilometre from the water to find a suitable place to nest. 
Location... These terrapins are native to eastern and central North America. However, they have been introduced to parts of Europe, Africa and Asia and are considered an invasive species. 

Habitat... Inhabit a wide range of freshwater habitats, including rivers, swamps, lakes and ponds, usually in shallow, slow-flowing water. 

Diet...
Juveniles are carnivorous, whereas adults feed mainly on aquatic plants.

Least Concern

Triggerfish, Picasso (Rhinecanthus aculeatus)

Triggerfish, Picasso
Triggerfish, Picasso

The Picasso triggerfish is easily identified by its angular body, fin arrangement and colour pattern. It is the colour pattern which gives it its name as it displays blocks of colours, like a Picasso painting. Its is predominantly yellowish with bright blue, yellow, black, white and orange lines. It reaches a maxiumum length of 30cm and has a powerful jaw, equipped with sharp teeth. Its eyes are set on top of its head and can move independently to survey the scene for predators.


Fun Facts...

Picasso triggerfish can make grunting sounds to warn other fish of predators and can make a whirring sound when startled!


Location...

Found in the Indo-Pacific region, including the Hawaiian islands, Australia, Phillipines, South Africa and the Red Sea.



Habitat...

Inhabits shallow outer reef habitats, protected lagoons and subtidal reefs.



Diet...
Feeds on invertebrates and algae. Also crustaceans, sea urchins, worms, snails and brittlestars.

Not Evaluated

Turtle, European pond (Emys orbicularis)

Turtle, European pond
Turtle, European pond

The European pond turtle is olive, brown on black in colour and it is easy to identify by the bright yellow or gold speckling on the skin. Markings seem to relate to where the turtle is found geographically - in the north of its range the marks are larger and darker than their southern counterparts. Males eyes can vary from red, yellow and brownish-yellow to pure white and females eyes are generally yellow or white. The carapace length can reach about 23cm.


Fun Facts...

The European pond turtle has a very long life span of up to 100 years and the sex of the offspring is dependent on the incubation temperature of the eggs, with females only appearing at 28 degrees Celcius or higher.


Location...

This species is native to most of Europe although it has been introduced to Belgium, Luxembourg and the United Kingdom.



Habitat...

This turtle is semi-aquatic and inhabits ponds, lakes, brooks, streams, rivers and canals.



Diet...
Feeds on fish, amphibians, tadpoles, worms, molluscs, crustaceans and insects.

Near Threatened
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Santa and his helpers are putting the finishing touches to his grotto and fattening up the reindeer ready for their long journey to SeaQuarium Rhyl. 

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FREE Activity Booklet!

During your visit to the SeaQuarium, don’t forget to take part in our free children’s activity booklet.
Pick up a booklet, find the answers to the questions around SeaQuarium and play some fun games along the way! Children will even receive a sticker at the end of their visit when shown to a member of staff!

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